You are hereForums / Preparation / Training / Why we race: The psychology of winning

Why we race: The psychology of winning


Dicko's picture

By Dicko - Posted on 03 December 2014

NB: Originally posted elsewhere on the Global Riders Network and appears via syndication.

Why we race: The psychology of winning

http://cyclingtips.com.au/2014/12/why-we-race-th...

Tags
flowbikes's picture

Psychology Smiling

Brian's picture

I know which one I am Smiling

hawkeye's picture

I'm definitely in it for the "mastery" aspects of competing. Although I'm not sure my "Super Masters" category is *at all* reflective of my abilities Laughing out loud

Warthog's picture

Thanks for posting Dicko, must say why I race question has come up a few times on those long rides towards the end of a season or on those early winter mornings. Don't know the answer yet though.

Dicko's picture

Minter your kidding right !

You are one of the most aggressive non elite racers out there. The drive and competitive edge you have is unlike no other.

Survival of the fittest !

Anyway - thats my interpretation of your ability ! Smiling

D

staffe's picture
Blades_Utd's picture

I associate with the ‘continuum’ aspect of the model. When I started racing 5 or so years ago I was in the mastery category but as I’ve trained, raced, and improved my results, I’m finding myself more focused on the performance goal. This does attract greater pressures as I both ‘want’ to do better but also ‘expect’ more of myself, and my friends and peers also have higher expectations of me. It’s odd as where before I was taking part for fun and to test myself whereas now I challenge myself to achieve a good placing.

It is something that I don’t manage very well, a couple of weeks before the Fling I was considering pulling out as I was simply over the training and was nervous as I ‘expected’ a good result.... but I had doubts, questioning myself before I got anywhere near the start line.

I still however believe that I take part to enjoy the race and the motivation to perform is not all encompassing, in both the Convict and the Fling this year I stopped to help others that were ahead of me at the time (ie. I was racing them), and would do the same again.

Oh, and Minter, +1 for what Wayne said, you race to win, no more to say.

SpokeyDokey's picture

All this talk about racing and psychology is just fanciful balderdash. We race to beat others. As for me, I race to grind Oldandslow into the dust. Only issue is that he rides the front of the tandem, and me behind. Never quite get there...

thshs's picture

It's been lonely dragging the tandem around without you, but I must say, I've moved on.
I've trimmed the beard and retired the beast I'd bought from Moore's in Brookvale 1982. No more Winnie reds tucked into the sleeve on the t-shirt, it's lycra all the way baby. You're no chance now on either the KSC or the Maybrook Manor enduro.

SpokeyDokey's picture

Good to be back. My hiatus has seen the return of my 10 speed Speedwell for some Alexander Street hill sprints as well as my old Supergoose (sans tuffs). I'm ready, my friend. I've even gone and got us a fat tyre tandem so we can be part of the crowd on Manly Beach, and fit in the après coffee crowd at Hemingways. Anyway, to the racing. Ive fielded calls from the Simpson Desert Bike Challenge, and the Croc Trophy, but I think this country has become too small for us. The Tour Divide now has an optional extension. It starts again in Banff, and the soft ones stop in some god-foresaken hole in New Mexico, but I've told 'em we'd be up for the extension down to Punta Arenas (I had to look it up; doesn't look too far). There's only one other tandem entry; some turkeys called Levi Leipheimer and Lance Armstrong. Not sure who these clowns are, but we'll whip 'em. Ah, the psychology of racing

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Best Mountain Bike